The most beautiful buildings in the world, according to architects

Well, if it’s according to Architects it must be true…

The Parthenon in Athens, Greece.

The Parthenon in Athens, Greece.

The Parthenon’s architects: Phidias, Callicrates, and Ictinus Wikimedia Commons

“It’s the quintessential beautiful architectural form,” Tara Imani says. “The Corinthian columns, the use of entasis [a slight curve in columns] to make sure the columns didn’t look spindly from a distance…the siting on a hilltop — it gave us our initial ABCs of architecture that we keep trying to use and improve upon today.”

 

The Forbidden City temple in Beijing, China.

The Forbidden City temple in Beijing, China.

The Forbidden City’s architects: Nguyễn An, Cai Xin, and Kuai Xiang Wikipedia Commons

“It has amazing scale and longevity of the design, complex structure, yet simple forms,” Rosa Sheng says. “My grandfather…explained that architecture is meant to last beyond one’s lifetime. It is a living time capsule of the culture for an entire civilization.”

The Innovation, Science, and Technology building at Florida Polytechnic University in Lakeland.

The Innovation, Science, and Technology building at Florida Polytechnic University in Lakeland.

The IST building’s architect: Santiago CalatravaMarica McKeel

“When I worked for Santiago Calatrava, I was part of the team that procured the Florida Polytechnic University campus project,” says Marica McKeel. “Not only to do I love the design of the Innovation, Science and Technology building, but I feel a real connection to this project and to the Lakeland community as my father grew up in Lakeland and I still frequently visit family there.”

 

The Niterói Contemporary Art Museum (MAC) in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil

The Niterói Contemporary Art Museum (MAC) in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil

MAC’s architect: Oscar Niemeyer Wikipedia

The MAC hangs over the water, a simple collection of lines and curves inspired by flowers growing in the landscape of Rio de Janeiro,” Peter Exley says. “A beautiful, sweeping pink line marks the pathway to the entrance of the building.  It’s the most charming arrival to any building; Unpretentious, gentle, poetic, and steeped in anticipation.”

 

The Church of the Light in Osaka, Japan.

The Church of the Light in Osaka, Japan.

The Church of the Light’s architect: Tadao Ando YouTube/A as Architecture

“[Architect] Tadao Ando is able to create beautiful spaces that embody monolithic presence, spacious, simple forms with an intriguing play of light which appears to dance throughout the day,” says Frank Cunha III. “The pushing and tugging of heavy forms and open space create a very unique, magical experience.”

Casa Mila in Barcelona, Spain.

Casa Mila in Barcelona, Spain.

Casa Mila’s architect: Antonio Gaudi Rob Shenk/Flickr 

Casa Mila is “exuberant, context-rich, sensual, and imbued with a rich urban residential character,” Clark Manus says.

Fallingwater in Mill Run, Pennsylvania.

Fallingwater in Mill Run, Pennsylvania.

Fallingwater’s architect: Frank Lloyd Wrightvia/flickr

“The rigid planes of the cantilevered balconies are pure modernist forms inserted into the heart of the forest,” says Bruce Turner. “Most importantly however, the thing that solidified this building as my favorite of all time doesn’t show up in any photos: the arrival sequence to the house. You arrive on a small country road, turn into the property, wind you way through the woods, and the house finally appears in the distance.”

Notre Dame du Haut in Ronchamp, France.

Notre Dame du Haut in Ronchamp, France.

Notre Dame du Haut’s architect: Le Corbusier Wikipedia Commons

“The building stands boldly, innovatively, looking to the future, while also respective its place and the past,” says Jonathan R. Brown.

The TWA Flight Center at JFK Airport in Jamaica, New York.

The TWA Flight Center at JFK Airport in Jamaica, New York.

The TWA Flight Center’s architect: Eero Saarinen Joseph David

The TWA Flight Center was “designed before the age of computers and decades ahead of its time. The building uses concrete and glass to capture all of the excitement, wonder and romance of jet travel,” Joseph E. David says. “At every view and every angle, there is something new to admire. 50 years after it opened, it somehow manages to feel like it’s still from the future.”

The Lloyd’s Building in London.

The Lloyd’s Building in London.

The Lloyd’s Building’s architect: Richard Rogers Martin Pettitt/Flickr

“It is the most extreme and intricate of the high-tech building’s style, revealing nearly all of its structure, stairs, elevators and mechanicals on the exterior,” Jeffrey Roberts says. “The building takes on the appearance of a giant engine turned vertical and placed in juxtaposition to the neighboring historic buildings. I like the architectural honesty of the building.”

There’s a lot more to buildings than the actual construction of them. There’s the design and the architecture which is very different to building it! For more information, check out our Civil Engineering courses today by following this link!

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