Archive | October 2016

Happy Diwali!

If you’re unfamiliar with the traditions, have a read of what it is, why it started and more…

When is Diwali?

An Indian Sikh
Sacred: Diwali is a five day Festival of Lights

The date of Diwali changes each year as the day it is celebrated is calculated according to the position of the moon and the Hindu lunar calendar.

This year, Diwali falls on Sunday October 30.

What is Diwali?

Diwali
Releasing flying lanterns as part of the festivities in Punjab

Diwali is the five-day Festival of Lights and is traditionally celebrated by Hindus, Sikhs and Jains and is one of the most significant festivals in the Indian culture.

The word Diwali means rows of lighted lamps and it is known as the Festival of Lights because houses and shops are decorated with candles and colourful lights. This shows the victory of light over darkness and good over evil.

For many Indians, Diwali honours Lakshmi, the goddess of wealth and people will start the new business year at Diwali and some will say prayers to the goddess for a prosperous year ahead.

How is Diwali celebrated?

Diwali
Indian people stand next to lanterns displayed at a roadside on the eve of Diwali in Mumbai

Large firework displays are held which celebrate one of the Diwali legends, Rama and his wife Sita.

The fireworks signify Rama’s return to his kingdom after being exiled for 14 years and defeating king Ravana, when the local people set off their own version of fireworks.

Indian Sikh
Riches: For some Hindus the festival is dedicated to Lakshmi, goddess of wealth

Those celebrating Diwali also light traditional earthenware oil lamps called diyas which are said to help Lakshmi, the goddess of wealth, find her way into people’s homes. They’ll leave their windows and doors of their houses open so that she can enter.

 A Malaysian Hindu women
Gifts: Friends and family share sweets, fruit and presents

People will also create rangoli artwork which are patterns created using coloured rice or powder, with the most popular pattern being the lotus flower as Lakshmi was often pictured either sitting on one or holding a lotus.

During Diwali, families and friends share sweets, dried fruit and gifts, and many give food and goods to those who are less fortunate and in need. It is also a time when people spring-clean and redecorate their homes and wear new clothes.

Source: mirror.co.uk / Getty images

 

19 of THE best hot chocolates to have this Autumn…

It’s a windy Thursday evening, you’ve already realised this week that summer is long gone with woolly knits and chunky boots becoming firm statements in your winter wardrobe and to make it that little bit worse it’s not quite Friday yet!  So why not make yourself feel better by over indulging in an Autumn hot choc. Makes sense right?  I guarantee you’ll be wanting one after looking at these recipes…

1. Salted Caramel Hot Chocolate

Luxury in every sip. Get the recipe here.

2. Red Wine Hot Chocolate

A marriage of two beautiful things. Get the recipe here.

3. Spiked Peppermint Hot Chocolate

Cool and frosty. Get the recipe here.

4. The World’s Best Hot Chocolate

BuzzFeed

Truly indulgent and truly delicious. Get the recipe here.

5. Fancy-Ass Hot Chocolate

This may look simple, but looks are deceiving – this packs salt, cinnamon and vanilla. Get the recipe here.

6. Almond Chia Seed Hot Chocolate

I mean, it’s almost healthy really. Get the recipe here.

7. Black Cherry Bourbon Hot Chocolate

Bourbon + hot chocolate = perfect night in. Get the recipe here.

8. Gingerbread Hot Chocolate

Sugar and spice and all things nice. Get the recipe here.

9. Floating Iceberg Hot Chocolate

Boost your hot chocolate with the cutest iceberg topping. Get the recipe here.

10. S’mores Hot Chocolate

Basically an excuse to boost your toasted marshmallow intake. Get the recipe here.

11. Raspberry Hot Chocolate with Nutella Whipped Cream

The sweetest thing. Get the recipe here.

12. Amaretto Hot Chocolate Floats

A terribly grown up way to get your chocolate fix. Get the recipe here.

13. Hot White Chocolate with Coconut and Cashew

Nicky Corbishley/ craftberrybush.com

Sneakily healthy, clearly delicious. Get the recipe here.

14. Stout Hot Chocolate

Dark, rich and right up my street. Get the recipe here.

15. Cookie Butter White Hot Chocolate

Cookie butter was made for white hot chocolate. Get the recipe here.

16. Vegan Coconut Hot Chocolate

Zero dairy but loads of flavour. Get the recipe here.

17. Boozy Pumpkin White Hot Chocolate

Add a little extra somethin’ to your glass. Get the recipe here.

18. Fresh Mint Hot Chocolate

A fresh sprig of mint will boost your choc. Get the recipe here.

19. Super Decadent Spanish Hot Chocolate

Classy cocoa. Get the recipe here.

The History of Halloween and what to do if you’re too old for Trick-or-Treating!

Halloween is just around the corner, but have you ever stopped to wonder why we actually celebrate it? Plus there’s some tips for last minute Halloween plans.

trick-or-treat

Halloween and Its History

Halloween is celebrated across the world on the night of October 31st.

Modern day celebrations generally involve groups of children dressed as spooky characters wandering from house to house, shouting “trick-or-treat” as you open your door. ‘Pretending’ to fear the worst, you usually just hand over a large amounts of sweets to avoid whatever gruesome tricks may have been dreamt up by these little monsters. The origins of these celebrations however go back thousands of years, even to pagan times.

The origins of Halloween can be traced back to the ancient Celtic festival of Samhain. Until 2,000 years ago, the Celts lived across the lands we know as Britain, Ireland and northern France; essentially farming and agricultural people. Samhain marked the end of summer, the harvest and the beginning of the dark cold winter. The festival symbolised the boundary between the world of the living and the dead.

It was believed that on the night of October 31st, ghosts of the dead would revisit the mortal world and large bonfires were lit in each village in order to ward off any evil spirits that may be at large.

What to do on Halloween?

Things to do on Halloween besides knocking down your neighbours doors for sweet treats.

You’re officially too old for trick-or-treating (and still haven’t emotionally healed from having to say goodbye to all those free goodies – so long, sugar fix) so here are a few alternatives…

  • If you’re able to throw a party, why not?

Come up with a theme and have your guests dress based on this, it could be anything from a film or you might want to go with the idea of zombies, demons and ghosts or even your favourite DC character.

Once you’ve got your theme out of the way you can then decide how you will host, will you fill your friends with laughter or fear? The choice is yours.

  • Low-key Get Together

If you don’t feel like going out why not just have a few friends round?

You could just have a fuddle and watch a few films, there’s always plenty to watch around Halloween. Tell spooky stories or you could play pranks on one another – try not to fall out though.

  • Have any younger siblings?

If you don’t have any plans and won’t be joining the dark side this Halloween, instead of having your siblings running around the house why not take the young padawans trick-or-treating?

Alternatively you could get creative and carve some pumpkins, youngsters always like to get involved with this sort of stuff.

None of the above?

If you’re looking for something more to do on Halloween just quickly search the internet there’s plenty of suggestions. Don’t go too overboard though, you don’t know what may be lurking around the next corner…

Happy Halloween!!

 

Get the Halloween Look…

We all might have grown out of Trick or Treating but we definitely haven’t grown out of dressing up and re-creating some awesomely gruesome Halloween looks. The competition gets bigger and better every year and as tonight is most likely the night you’ll be hitting the town with your mates dressed as dead Harley Quinn’s, Skele’s or even Traffic cones (no kidding, they have been spotted in recent years), it’s the perfect opportunity to get creative! Check out these amazing face paints and see if you can better them…

1. The eyes have it.

4. Crystal visions.

Chloe Hajjar / chlojar.tumblr.com / Via pinterest.com

7. Cosplay Chesire cat.

Cosplay Chesire cat.

10. Secret snake girl.

11. An eye mask — not the soothing kind.

12. Lady Two Face.

Robert Sanque / Flickr: robertsanque / Via pinterest.com

13. Broken doll.

Learn how to do it here.

14. The half-dead girl.

15. Double face.

16. The notebook.

17. Patchwork doll.

Abigail Lewis / Via Facebook: TwistedtheClown

19. Ventriloquist dummy.

 

17 facts you never knew about GBBO!

GBBO 2016 comes to an end tonight (wah!). To wave it off we’ve done a bit of digging and found these 17 surprising facts you never knew about the show…

1) Anyone can apply for Bake Off – except professional bakers or chefs!

Applications are open to any UK resident over the age of 16. However they cannot make their main source of income from commercial baking and entrants can’t have worked as a professional chef or baker at any point. Plus, applicants cannot have acquired any professional catering qualifications in the last ten years.

2) The GBBO application form is l-o-n-g

It’s seven pages long, asks a LOT of questions, and demands you reveal the truth about your previous successes and failures in the kitchen.

You can find it here.

3) And the Great British Bake Off application process doesn’t stop there!

If they like what they see on your application form, a researcher will call you and give you a 45 minute interview over the phone.

Then, if you pass THAT test, they’ll have you whip up two baked treats, bring them to London, have an interview with a producer, and go through a screen test.

Think you’re done? Nope!

You then have to try out a Technical Challenge set by Paul Hollywood and Mary Berry themselves – in front of the camera. They also ask that you bring another bake along (presumably the producers are taste testing these / big fans of cake).

If you’re still in the running, you’ll then be interviewed by the show’s psychologist to make sure they can handle the pressure of filming.

Phew!

4) GBBO filming is intense

The show is filmed over a 10-week period between April and June, with contestants spending up to 16 hours a day filming.

They manage to package up a whole session of baking into one hour, which means that a lot of it ends up on the cutting room floor.

5) … but at least it’s contained to weekends

That’s right, contestants only do their GBBO stuff on weekends, which means that they can keep working their normal 9-to-5 jobs in the week.

However they are picked up from their hotels at 9am each Saturday and Sunday morning, to ensure they get as much filming time in as possible.

No rest for the wicked, eh?

6) GBBO contestants don’t do the washing up themselves

There’s no dishwasher on Bake Off, because the noise would disrupt filming. Instead, home economists spend 160 hours washing up everything by hand. We hope they all get given a free hand lotion each…

7) GBBO contestants pay for ingredients themselves

Yup, that’s right; they only get their ingredients provided when they reach the finals – which makes things pretty expensive. Particularly as they use between 12-20 ingredients per bake.

8) A lot of people are involved in the production of GBBO

There are around 50 crew members on set – and, yes, they all get to tuck into the cakes and goodies after Paul Hollywood and Mary Berry pass judgement.

9) GBBO contestants are encouraged to become friends

Producers taken them all out for dinner together on the first night, and they usually become good pals over time; they often stay at the same hotel, so dinners and drinks and socialising become pretty regular.

Which means that, yes, they really DO mean it when they say they’re happy for the overall winner – they’re pretty much all besties by that point!

10) They make more cakes than you’d ever dreamed of…

They bake a Victoria Sponge in each oven every single morning of filming, to make sure everything is ship-shape and ready to go. We imagine everyone gets a bit sick of tucking into that particular type of cake come the end of filming, eh?

11) The show is LITERALLY based on village fetes

That’s right; Anna Beattie, the show’s creator, really believed that village fete baking competitions would suit TV. Anna, judging by the viewing figures, she was 100% correct!

The duo were approached to present the show together – and they were quick to suggest that Mary Berry should be a judge.

13) It’s not a disaster if someone forgets an ingredient

In fact, producers are well and truly prepared if this happens; they have a runner on standby at a local supermarket every morning in case a contestant realises overnight that they’ve forgotten an ingredient.

14) Oven time is crucial

So much so that contestants aren’t allowed to put anything in – or take anything out of – the oven without flagging a producer down first. They want to make sure that they have a camera on standby to film those big baking moments,

15) The Bake Off challenges are NOT surprises

If you make it through to the Bake Off finals, you will be told what the challenges are going to be – and you’ll have to submit your recipes for approval. Eep! No pressure, eh?

16) Mary Berry and Paul Hollywood are off limits

They prefer to keep things professional with contestants, and don’t usually speak to them outside of the Bake Off tent.

17) … but Mel and Sue aren’t

The duo are happy to chat to contestants away from the cameras – and Sue has even said that she likes to stay in touch with them via email once the show is all over. N’aw!

Source: Independent

 

Do you think you could be a GBBO star? Maybe you need to kick start your catering career first? Why not look at the courses we have at the College.

Happy Diwali!

We’ve got all the facts you need to know for celebrating Diwali, the annual festival celebrated by millions around the world Diwali

People celebrating Diwali festival night in Patiala, Punjab, India

The bright and beautiful annual celebration of Diwali starts today, with millions of people getting set to light up their lives for five days of festivities.

Marked by Hindus, Sikhs and Jains, the event’s theme is triumph of light over darkness and good over evil, knowledge over ignorance, and hope over despair.

As well as houses being decorated with candles and colourful lights, those who are marking the celebrations share gifts and recite prayers in the name of happy, healthy

If you’re unfamiliar with the traditions, have a read of what it is, why it started and more.

When is Diwali?

An Indian Sikh
Sacred: Diwali is a five day Festival of Lights

The date of Diwali changes each year as the day it is celebrated is calculated according to the position of the moon and the Hindu lunar calendar.

This year, Diwali falls on Sunday October 30.

What is Diwali?

Diwali
Releasing flying lanterns as part of the festivities in Punjab

Diwali is the five-day Festival of Lights and is traditionally celebrated by Hindus, Sikhs and Jains and is one of the most significant festivals in the Indian culture.

The word Diwali means rows of lighted lamps and it is known as the Festival of Lights because houses and shops are decorated with candles and colourful lights. This shows the victory of light over darkness and good over evil.

For many Indians, Diwali honours Lakshmi, the goddess of wealth and people will start the new business year at Diwali and some will say prayers to the goddess for a prosperous year ahead.

How is Diwali celebrated?

Diwali
Indian people stand next to lanterns displayed at a roadside on the eve of Diwali in Mumbai

Large firework displays are held which celebrate one of the Diwali legends, Rama and his wife Sita.

The fireworks signify Rama’s return to his kingdom after being exiled for 14 years and defeating king Ravana, when the local people set off their own version of fireworks.

Indian Sikh
Riches: For some Hindus the festival is dedicated to Lakshmi, goddess of wealth

Those celebrating Diwali also light traditional earthenware oil lamps called diyas which are said to help Lakshmi, the goddess of wealth, find her way into people’s homes. They’ll leave their windows and doors of their houses open so that she can enter.

A Malaysian Hindu women
Gifts: Friends and family share sweets, fruit and presents

People will also create rangoli artwork which are patterns created using coloured rice or powder, with the most popular pattern being the lotus flower as Lakshmi was often pictured either sitting on one or holding a lotus.

During Diwali, families and friends share sweets, dried fruit and gifts, and many give food and goods to those who are less fortunate and in need. It is also a time when people spring-clean and redecorate their homes and wear new clothes.

Source: mirror.co.uk / Getty images

Last minute Halloween recipes

Last call for Halloween recipes!

Here are 12 favourites that we’ve seen…

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Pretzel Ghosts

Pretzel Ghosts

Get the recipes here: http://bit.ly/1q6z0JV
No Bake Halloween Dirt Cake

No Bake Halloween Dirt Cake

Get the recipes here: http://bit.ly/1LWZaPn
Halloween Funnel Cakes

Halloween Funnel Cakes

Get the recipe here: http://bit.ly/1XcuHys
Spiderweb Eggs

Spiderweb Eggs

Get the recipe here: http://bit.ly/1q6z0JV
Meringue Bones

Meringue Bones

Get the recipe here: http://bit.ly/1q6z0JV
Silly Frankenstein Smiles

Silly Frankenstein Smiles

Get the recipe here: http://bit.ly/1q6z0JV
Halloween Rocky Road Squares

halloween Rocky Road Squares

Get the recipes here: http://bit.ly/1XcuWtA
Halloween Test Tube Shooters

Halloween Test Tube Shooters

Get the recipe here: http://bit.ly/1LC8Mgt
Halloween Pumpkin Chip Cookies

Halloween Pumpkin Chip Cookies

Get the recipe here: http://bit.ly/1Gc8WLe
No Bake Grave Yard Cheesecake

No Bake Grave Yard Cheesecake

Get the recipe here: http://bit.ly/1LhEzBN
Apple Monsters

Apple Monsters

bit.ly
bit.ly
Get the recipe here: http://bit.ly/1OBSshY
Creepy Chili

Creepy Chili

Get the recipe here: http://bit.ly/1Nim691

With Halloween just one week away have you thought about your outfit yet?

6 of the Weirdest Halloween Costume Ideas in Sheffield Mad-Hatter-Costume-620x413

Halloween is never easy. Getting that blend of scare factor without looking like everyone else is tough.

Thankfully, Wow247 have enlisted the help of the guys at Molly Limpet’s Theatrical Emporium.

Take a look at their spook-tacular suggestions below.

1. Alice in Wonderland characters

Queen Hearts Costume

Any Tim Burton-esque costumes are popular at Halloween and these character-based costumes are some of our most popular ones. They’re both iconic and effective, and customers can easily complete the look with simple make up and eye accessories.

2. Davy Jones

davy jones Costume

Pirates – one of our favourite themes – lend themselves to a lot of ‘dark’ interpretations. With these stunningly tailored costumes and with some liquid latex, makeup and perhaps eye accessories you can create a very dramatic effect.

3. Sweeney Todd & Mrs Lovett

Sweeney Todd Costume

Another Tim Burton interpretation of a classic horror character! Great for couples, Mrs Lovett and Sweeney Todd are easy to wear, and require the minimum of makeup to create maximum effect – dark eyes, blacked out teeth, backcombed hair with white/powder streaks through all mean you don’t have to wear masks/wigs (a lot of customers want to avoid this as it adds heat).

4. Zombie Hunters

zombe hunter costume

A new one for this year; we get asked loads for zombies, but someone has to hunt them! The coat can also be used to interpret different characters if required, so we do try to encourage customers to look at a lot of our non-Halloween costumes and make them into gothic/horror versions.

5. Steampunks

Steampunk costume

A style that is emerging more and more – essentially Victorian or period costumes fused with sci-fi / mechanical accessories.

Fancy putting costumes together, or even creating them yourselves as a living? Have a look into our fashion and clothesmaking courses and apprenticeships on offer at The Sheffield College now!

Source: http://www.wow247.co.uk/2015/10/15/halloween-costume-ideas/#ixzz3pfainnNl

The Books Behind Your Favourite TV Shows

The majority of good programmes on television stem from a well known book. But there are many of your favourites out there that come from a lesser known book. Like these…

Outlander Series by Diana Gabaldon

outlander

Before Claire Randall and Jamie Fraser were frolicking across our screens in the time-travelling, Jacobean-era drama Outlander, they could be found on the pages of Diana Gabaldon’s 1991 novel of the same name.

Seven bestselling books have since followed, with an eighth on its way.

Darkly Dreaming Dexter by Jeff Lindsay

Dexter

Vigilante psychopath Dexter first appeared in a Jeff Lindsay novel, focusing on Dexter’s attempts to track down the ‘Tamiami slasher’.

Despite some major plot differences, Dexter’s narration is as darkly humorous in the books as it is on the small screen.

Red Dragon by Thomas Harris

Hannibal

Hannibal Lecter has been portrayed in TV and film several times, most notably by Anthony Hopkins in Silence of the Lambs in 1991.

Mads Mikkelsen is the latest actor to play the cannibalistic psychiatrist in TV series Hannibal, based on events before Thomas Harris’s spine chilling and thrilling novel Red Dragon.

Gomorrah: Italy’s Other Mafia by Roberto Saviano

Roberto Saviano’s staggering exposé of the neapolitan camorra crime families has seen him moved under permanent police protection, due to a string of death threats.

While this adaptation Gomorrah – La Serie is only loosely related to the book, it’s worth reading up on the source material to get a better idea of how the Camorra clans effect everyday life in Naples.

Orange is the New Black: My Year in a Woman’s Prison by Piper Kerman

Orange is the new black

Netflix heavyweight Orange is the New Black was inspired by Piper Kerman’s memoir that documented her time in a female prison.

The book is an intriguing story of self-preservation in the face of everyday persecution, which has been brilliantly built on by the TV series.

Kurt Wallander Series by Henning Mankell

If you’re caught up with BBC drama Wallander, you have two options; watch the Swedish TV series that began three years before, or read the 11-book-long series that inspired both TV shows.

Penned by Henning Mankell, the soul-searching detective is every bit as readable in the books as he is watchable in the TV series.

Boardwalk Empire: The Birth, High Times and Corruption of Atlantic City by Nelson Johnson

kelly-macdonald-boardwalk-e

Nelson Johnson’s work chronicles the toxic corruption that moulded the city in the 1920s and 30s led by real-life figure Enoch “Nucky” Thompson.

If you’ve watched all five series of Boardwalk Empire and are yearning for more details of the prohibition era, the book that inspired the brilliant series is a good place to start.

Deadwood by Pete Dexter

Ian McShane

It’s important to note that the cult Western’s creators have denied using Peter Dexter’s book for inspiration when making the gloriously expletive-laden TV series.

However, both pieces of work are set in the Black Hills of Dakota, and both feature the same cast, including Sheriff Seth Bullock. Perhaps the void left in your life following Deadwood’s cancellation can finally be filled?

Jessica Jones by Brian Michael Bendia and Michael Gaydos

Jessica Jones

If you can’t wait for the second series of Jessica Jones – set to be released in 2017 – why not dive into some of the comics that inspired the show and its bad-ass superheroine?

Alias #1-28, which introduces the flawed protagonist, is a good place to start.

The Poldark Saga by Winston Graham

Poldark

Back in 1945, when sex-symbol Aidan Turner’s mother was merely a twinkle in her father’s eye, Winston Graham penned the first of 12 Poldark stories – the final instalment being somewhat astonishingly finished many decades later, in 2002.

If the lavish series alone isn’t providing you with your period drama fix, then get stuck into the epic written saga.

A Song of Ice and Fire by George R. R. Martin

Sean bean Game Of Thrones

Martin’s sprawling series of fantasy books, starting with Game Of Thrones, fill in all of the gaps that the glorious TV series simply can’t squeeze into an hour long episode.

Starting the books might seem intimidating – some are well over 1,000 pages – but it’s a journey well worth embarking on, laden with additional fascinating sub-plots and countless more compelling characters.

Killing Pablo: The Hunt for the World’s Greatest Outlaw by Mark Bowden

Narcos

If you’re keen to see beyond the witty dialogue and explosive action sequences in Netflix’s Narcos, this one’s for you.

Have a read of Bowden’s story on the rise of the world’s most notorious drug lord – and the subsequent manhunt that followed.

The Gangs of Birmingham: From the Sloggers to the Peaky Blinders by Philip Gooderson

Peaky Blinders

The Peaky Blinders were a real gang in Birmingham, and they really did sew razor blades into the peaks of their caps; but that’s where the similarities with the TV series ends.

Here you can read about the real ‘peaky blinders’ that inspired Cillian Murphy’s ruthless Shelby mob.

Daredevil by Stan Lee

Daredevil

Marvel legend Stan Lee created Daredevil – the blind Lawyer with super senses – back in 1964.

Get stuck into the comics that spawned one of Netflix’s biggest hits, and some of the finest fight sequences ever seen on the small screen.

It’s probably fair to say that all our blockbusters are derived from a good book. In that sense then, that could be seen as the first stage of film production. Why not think about being a script writer and look into our English Literature courses today?! Click for more…

The Walking Dead – Retold in 8-bit

Yes, fans of The Walking Dead and old school gaming platforms you have read the title right. Get yourselves excited, maybe grab some popcorn, and hit play…

 

CineFix have retold the first two seasons of The Walking Dead via old-school 8-bit (and a little 16-bit) game tech. Our 8-bit Cinema series “gamifies” your favorite Hollywood blockbusters (and now TV shows) into ’80s arcade- and NES-inspired action.

Subscribe to CineFix for more videos:https://www.youtube.com/c/cinefix

Fancy designing something similar? You could adapt a current tv-smash or, if you’ve got the ideas in tow, come up with something totally original. Our Games Design courses will support you to do that throughout your time with us – click for more…