Archive | April 2016

Food Photographer of the Year 2016

If you’re not eating, you’re probably looking at food. If you’re not looking, you’re probably thinking about it. It’s kind of just what happens. So, obviously when the food photographs of the year were announced, we were straight in there having a nosey

Kids’ table – by Lucy Pope (UK)

Winner of the Food Sn-apping category

Kids' table - by Lucy Pope (UK)

Octopus on Ice – by Petra Novotna (Czech Republic)

Winner of the Cream of the Crop category

Octopus on Ice - by Petra Novotna (Czech Republic)

Treasure of the Sea – by Olimpia Davies

Winner of the Food Bloggers category

Treasure of the Sea - by Olimpia Davies

he Grand Kitchen – by Shoeb Faruqee (Bangladesh)

Winner of the Champagne Taittinger Food for Celebration category

The Grand Kitchen - by Shoeb Faruqee (Bangladesh)

Go home – by Viktoriia Moskalenko (Ukraine)

Winner of the Bring Home the Harvest category

Go home - by Viktoriia Moskalenko (Ukraine)

Appreciate every piece – by Marcin Jucha (UK)

Winner of the Politics of Food category

Appreciate every piece - by Marcin Jucha (UK)

Salmon still life – by Susan Bell (UK)

Winner of the Production Paradise Food off the Press category

Salmon still life - by Susan Bell (UK)

Floating Vegetable Market – by Paula Watts (USA)

Winner of the Partridges Food for sale category

Floating Vegetable Market - by Paula Watts (USA)

Mayasara Winery – by Robert Holmes (USA)

Winner of the Errazuriz Wine Photographer of the Year category

Puno, Lake Titicaca - by Robert Holmes (USA)

Chicken Cheese toastie – by Jean Cazals (UK)

Winner of the Marks and Spencer Food Portraiture category

Chicken Cheese toastie - by Jean Cazals (UK)

Picnic – by Maja Danica Pecanic (Croatia)

Winner of the Food for the Family category

Picnic - by Maja Danica Pecanic (Croatia)

Unstill life – by Polina Plotnikova (UK)

Winner of the Pink Lady An Apple a Day category

Unstill life - by Polina Plotnikova (UK)

The wild garlic carpet – by Robin Goodlad (UK)

Winner of the Food in the Field category

The wild garlic carpet - by Robin Goodlad (UK)

Oh my, that cheese toastie. Cheese. Toast. Mouthwatering! Anyway, being behind the lens on a food photo shoot must have benefits – free food you’d really hope! Take a look at our Photography courses if you fancy some free scran, or you could always stick with the making of the scran on our Catering courses.

 

Could you cut it in the fashion industry?

Certain industries are pretty hard to break into. It might take a bit of hard work but it’s definitely possible to do it though. Fashion is one that’s always had that stigma, but it can be done and just think of the glamour when you do make it!

What do these Fashion jobs actually involve?

Designer

As a graduate fashion designer, you can apply for junior design roles with retailers, brands and designers. It’s a competitive business and everyone is looking for the individuals with the strongest portfolios, so communicating your ideas well in 2D is essential.

You need to be prolifically creative, have a point of view and have strong research and drawing skills. A good eye for colour, fabric, silhouette and details, a good technical understanding and an interest in all areas of fashion past, present and future are also a big advantage. To thrive in a design studio, you’ll need to be a great communicator with excellent problem-solving skills, and be able to work well in a team.

Being a fashion designer is a lifestyle, as much as it is a job. Designers often work very long hours, including weekends, and can also travel extensively for research, fabric sourcing or factory visits. The best way to get a foot in the door is through work placements and internships.

Pattern cutter

A creative pattern cutter’s job is to interpret the designer’s sketch and create a pattern for that garment.

As well as a keen interest in fashion and trends, you need good pattern-cutting techniques, drape skills and knowledge of construction and product development. Pattern cutters need to be well-organised team workers who can solve problems and communicate well. You also need to have good computer and numeracy skills.

Pattern cutters with the right creative and technical skills are in high demand, and many students on fashion design degree programmes move into creative pattern-cutting roles. Creative pattern cutters usually work within the studio or sample room alongside the design and product development teams.

Other pattern-cutting roles include production pattern cutters, whose job is more focused on the production of finished products.

Technologist

Garment technologists work with pattern cutters, product developers, fabric technologists and designers at all stages of garment development through to production.

Because of their detailed knowledge of manufacturing processes, they can be employed by manufacturers, retailers or brands to make sure everything is produced effectively and to a budget.

Garment technologists require strong communication skills and a thorough understanding of garment construction and manufacturing. The role can involve working in a design or sample studio, manufacturing unit or factory, and will often involve travel in the UK and to factories overseas.

Merchandiser

Merchandising is the commercial and business side of the fashion industry. Merchandisers support the buyers in defining the depth of the buys as well as the pricing, margin and seasonality of ranges. They must be able to predict future fashion and market trends in order to advise a store what they should stock and how much they will need. A key part of the role is managing stock in and out of the business and managing seasonal fashion and core continuity products.

Merchandisers essentially hold the purse strings and need to be mindful of budgets. It’s a data-heavy role that requires a good standard of maths. The key skill is to work with the creatives and manage business expectations without stifling creativity itself. The merchandiser works closely with marketing to ensure the right products are promoted at specific times during the year and are in stock.

As well as internal promotions, this kind of role could lead to a managing director or CEO position.

Sounding good to you? If only there was somewhere dead close to you where you could study Fashion! Who knew…

Extraordinary album covers

The album cover is as important as the album itself, right? Well maybe not quite, but it certainly isn’t far off. A good album cover stands out for generations. It means something. A terrible album cover gets panned and overshadows the music. So yeah, it is pretty important. Here are some of the best…

Smash Song Hits by Rodgers & Hart

Smash Song Hits

Early albums were covered in plain paper, to protect the record inside. Designer Alex Steinweiss suggested Columbia Records add images to the covers.

In this era of big band music the first illustrated cover was for an album by composers Rodgers and Hart and featured a theatre marquee with the duo’s names in lights. The experiment was a success and more graphic covers followed. These reportedly increased the company’s sales by over 800%. Meanwhile, advances in technology enabled more music to be included on an album. It not only revolutionised the music industry, but also increased the cover space available for artwork and sleeve notes.

Elvis Presley

Elvis Presley

When his debut LP was released Elvis was already famed for his exuberance. The cover is notable for its unstaged photo which captures that energy.

Elvis broke barriers between black and white music, and went on to global stardom. His vibrancy, highlighted in the cover’s image, was matched by the album’s ground-breaking bold pink and green typography. This outrageously hip cover was just a taster of the culture-changing music inside. In 1979 The Clash paid homage to the iconic cover by replicating the distinctive typeface over a monochrome photo on their album London Calling.

Blue Train by John Coltrane

Blue Train

One jazz music label, Blue Note, created a cool, recognisable house style and this strong identity was summed up on John Coltrane’s Blue Train.

The image encapsulates what music listeners found on the album: cerebral, stylish and complex nocturnal jazz. Graphic designer Reid Miles created over 500 covers for Blue Note and his work became synonymous with the label. Using an image on the cover that summed up the band’s sound became something many other bands did in next decades, notably in progressive rock. But in the 1960s, the arrival of psychedelic rock would take album covers in a whole new direction.

Sgt. Pepper’s Lonely Hearts Club Band by The Beatles

beatles 5

The Beatles’ Sgt. Pepper’s Lonely Hearts Club Band experimented with music and had a cover that did the same.

Artists Jann Haworth and Peter Blake created a sprawling collage of famous faces from Marilyn Monroe to Karl Marx. The cover deliberately reached out to fans by giving them, for the first time, a cover they could pore over, one that could hold the attention as long as the record itself. This followed on from The Velvet Underground and Nico’s Warhol-designed banana cover for their eponymous debut LP, which brought concept art into the mainstream.

Ogden’s Nut Gone Flake by The Small Faces

Ogden's Nut Gone Flake

A traditional tobacco tin was the inspiration for this Small Faces cover.

While bands experimented with artwork post Sgt Pepper, Small Faces played with the size and shape of packaging.

The LP was originally released in a metal, circular cover designed to replicate an over-sized tobacco tin. Unconventional and not entirely successful – the tins tended to roll off shelves – it was an expensive venture and later pressings of the album were released with an alternative gatefold cover. However it launched a series of unusually shaped covers, notably a whisky glass for Rod Stewart’s Sing it Again Rod, and a hinged sleeve in the shape of a lighter for Bob Marley’s Catch a Fire.

Horses by Patti Smith

Horses

Patti Smith’s defiant stare signalled a step-change for the image of women in rock music.

By the mid 70s, women’s lives were changing so Patti Smith used a photo of herself to convey a powerful woman looking defiantly at the world.

Smith emerged from New York’s creative underground. The Horses cover was a stark contrast to sleeves from other female artists of the era. In the same year it was released, Carly Simon posed in lingerie on the cover of her LP Playing Possum. Smith is unglamorous and androgynous, defiantly staring directly into the lens. This snapshot, taken by photographer Robert Mapplethorpe, became one of the defining images of women in rock. However, an even more startling cover was on its way.

Unknown Pleasures by Joy Division

In the aftermath of punk, Joy Division led a change in musical direction. The artwork on their first album mirrored their sparse sound.

The cover, by designer Peter Saville, showed a diagram of radio waves coming from a pulsar star. This artwork on this dark post-punk album contrasted with the post-hippie rainbow prism on Pink Floyd’s Dark Side of the Moon LP. Saville’s stylish work provided the perfect visual complement to Joy Division’s moody, slightly industrial sound. In his later work for Factory Records he designed a cover for New Order’s Blue Monday single which was so expensive to produce it lost the band money.

Rio by Duran Duran

Rio

By the 80s, a new slick look and sound appeared and was summed up by one band – Duran Duran.

A new culture of style emerged. The visuals became as important as the music. Bands began to rely on videos and airplay on MTV. The cover of Duran Duran’s Rio album has become as bound up with the 80s in the collective cultural memory as the Sony Walkman and shoulder pads. Designer Patrick Nagel’s illustration of a glamorous woman combined with on-trend stylish graphics by Malcolm Garrett combined to make a look that is identifiably 80s and well suited to this image-fixated age.

Before you have an inspirational album cover you obviously need an inspirational album to cover! And before you have an album you need to come and study Music here at The Sheffield College. Capiche?

The ultimate guide to Northern Slang: Part 2

Ok here’s the follow up to yesterday’s Part 1, naturally! We’ve had to leave a few out here. They were a little risque to be quite honest, and some were just downright inappropriate. Anyway, here’s what’s made the filtered cut…

Our Kid 

our-kid

noun \ˈär kid\

Definition: The brother or sister of the speaker.

Origins: Represents ownership of a sibling. Highlighting that they can order them to do things they would not do for others.

Synonyms: me bredren

Quebbin’ 

quebbin

verb \ˈkwi-ˈbin\

Definition: A state or feeling of extreme fear.

Origins: Mostly limited to St Helens, it comes from the noise made by a quivering sphincter during times of grave danger.

Synonyms: cacking it, fritnin

Rags

rags

verb \ˈræɡz\

Definition: Immense short-term pain.

Origins: Comes from ‘ragby’ the original 17th century name for rugby. This was a more vicious version of its modern counterpart, in which extreme pain was the aim of the game. Except for the version played by Southerners, which was for wimps and poshoes only.

Synonyms: kills

Rank 

rank

adjective \ˈraŋk\

Definition: Something deeply unpleasant to encounter.

Origins: A twist on the Swedish word ‘rank’ which means thin and weak.

Synonyms: grotty, honks

Scran 

scran

noun \ˈskræn\

Definition: A considerable amount of items to eat.

Origins: From the Dutch word ‘schranzen’ which means to consume excessively.

Synonyms: munch

Spiggy 

spiggy

noun \ˈspɪg-gɪ\

Definition: All forms of chewing gum. Including, but not restricted to, packaged gum, mid-chew stringy gunk and the dry husk found on pavements and bus seats.

Origins: Conflation of ‘spearmint’ and ‘gum’, though spiggy is not necessarily mint flavoured.

Synonyms: chuddy

Tight 

tight

adjective \ˈtīt\

Definition: Not wanting to share possessions or lend money.

Origins: An adaptation of the Biblical term ‘tight-fisted’ (Deuteronomy 15:7-8). Usually followed by the word ‘arse’ to imply someone so miserly they won’t even set free a fart.

Synonyms: sly, snidey

Undies

undies

noun \ˈən-dēz\

Definition: Clothing worn under outer clothes to conceal rude bits.

Origins: A convenient shortening of the word ‘underwear’.

Synonyms: gruds, underkecks

Yay Big

yay-big

adjective \ˈyā bɪɡ\

Definition: The dimensions of an object. Hand gestures are used simultaneously to demonstrate the appropriate size.

Origins: ‘Yay’ comes from the Middle English word ‘yea’, meaning ‘truly’. Over time it has come to mean ‘this’, referring to the space between one’s hands.

Synonyms: bout yon big

Slightly more Manchester bound these, but still file under ‘Northern’ if you are indeed a Southerner! Anyway, if you missed our English Language courses yesterday you can check them out again here. Sound, our kid? Sound.

19 Spectacular Samosas To Stuff In Your Mouth

Seeing as though our Catering Chief, Mick Burke, is up for a Catey, we thought we’d celebrate by bring you the king of Indian Street Food: The Samosa – bur not as you’ve ever seen it before…

1. Samosa grilled cheese

Samosa grilled cheese

Make this potato filling and put it in your signature grilled cheese.

2. Three cheese samosa

Three cheese samosa

Get the recipe here.

3. Chowmein noodles samosa

Chowmein noodles samosa

Get them at Ram G Corner in Moti Nagar, New Delhi.

You can even make it at home by following the recipe here.

4. Breakfast samosa

Breakfast samosa

Add mini samosas to your scrambled eggs and that’s about all you need to do.

5. Sweet potato samosa avocado toast

Sweet potato samosa avocado toast

@_kruti / Via instagram.com

Make the samosa filling by replacing the potato with sweet potato. Toast bread, spread some mashed avocado and the potato filling. Add your favourite chutney on top.

6. Samosa pull apart bread

Samosa pull apart bread

Get the recipe here.

7. Samosa spring rolls

Samosa spring rolls

Instead of the samosa pastry, roll the filling in wanton sheets and deep fry.

8. Wanton samosa

Wanton samosa

The same as the spring roll samosa but wrapped differently.

9. Potato tuna samosa

Potato tuna samosa

Get the recipe here.

10. Spinach cheese corn samosa

Spinach cheese corn samosa

Get the recipe here.

11. Beef and lamb coconut spiced samosas.

Beef and lamb coconut spiced samosas.

Learn to make them here.

12. Samosa sandwich

Samosa sandwich

Pretty much mashed up samosas between your favourite savoury sandwich.

13. Pizza samosa

Pizza samosa

Get them at Ram G Corner in Moti Nagar, New Delhi.

14. Samosa pot pie

Samosa pot pie

Get the recipe here.

15. Samosa Galette

Samosa Galette

Get the recipe here.

16. Chicken tikka samosa

Chicken tikka samosa

Get the recipe here.

17. Feta, fresh mint, and cashew nuts samosa

Feta, fresh mint, and cashew nuts samosa

18. Samosa-stuffed sweet potatoes

Samosa-stuffed sweet potatoes

Scoop out a boiled sweet potato and make filling with it. Put it back in the shell and back for 10 minutes.

19. Chocolate samosa

Chocolate samosa

Get the recipe here.

If you want to discover new recipes, master classics, or just be under the stewardship of Catey nominated Mick Burke, take a look at our Catering courses here at The Sheffield College today! 

Construction: An industry on the way up!

So obviously it’s important when training for a job, that there are going to be jobs there for you when you qualify! In fact, you’d probably say that’s about the most important wouldn’t you? Luckily, if you’re training for Construction you’re going to be just fine!

 

Construction is back

Construction. It’s where it’s at, according to the data! Jobs are waiting for you, and there’s to be 16,000 created where we are. Pretty decent. Take a peak at our Construction courses here, the industry needs you!

5 great apps for learning a language on the go

Being able to speak a second language is pretty invaluable these days. Whilst it’s not yet essential, it’s really starting to set people apart. Jobs, travelling, even just showing off; it’s a really handy skill to have! Wow247 show you how to master it on the move with these great apps!

Duolingo

 

Often considered the top dog of language apps, Duolingo gives you bitesize lessons from 10 to 20 minutes to tackle every day.

Using a number of interactive features, Duolingo users earn credits from successful answers to multiple choice questions, audio translations and typed-in phrases which open up further lessons. The goal is to get to 34 hours of app-time, which they say equals a whole term of university study.

Free – Google Play / Apple Store

 

Memrise

 

Memrise swaps the ‘tutor and student’ relationship of Dulingo for a more ‘student and student’ approach. The app, co-created by memory specialist Ed Cooke, uses flashcards and the ‘spacing effect’ memory retention technique in order to get those words to effectively lodge in your memory.

The flashcards are all user-generated, meaning they can be a little hit-and-miss at times, but when they work they make for a snappy and effective language tool.

Free – Google Play / Apple Store

iTranslate Voice

If you’re looking for something a little more instant than a daily language lesson, then iTranslate looks to solve your conundrums on the spot. Simply say the phrase you’re looking to translate in English, and it pops out the other end in foreign dialect – meaning you can simply repeat it back.

There’s also a handy phrasebook, and a feature which means you can chat to other users, with the app playing the translating middle man. Bellissimo.

HiNative

What better way to learn a language than from people who actually speak it? The HiNative app from social network Lang 8 lets you learn through asking questions such ‘How do you say this in French?’ or ‘What’s the difference between these two phrases?’ and even ‘Does this sound natural?’ where you can test your pronunciation.

The app is all about sharing, like coffee shop language lessons, and is a good way to get to grips with the culture as well as the language too. We’re also a big fan of their fat squirrel mascot.

Free – Google Play / Apple Store

Google Translate

Google Translate

Many of you will already be aware of Google Translate making your life on the internet a hell of a lot easier by translating articles, tweets and Facebook posts into English. But you may be unaware of the application’s nifty feature when you’re out and about.

If there’s a signpost, shop front or notice that your language skills cant quite master – simply point your camera towards it and Translate will work its magic to decipher the message. A helpful tool for keen travellers.

Free – Google Play / Apple Store

And when you’re not on the move, you should be studying for one of the languages on offer here at The Sheffield College. Take a look at them here! 

 

The ultimate guide to Northern Slang: Part 1 – A to M

Northern Slang varies. The accent changes. The dialect’s different. It varies a lot. Which is strange really, considering those Southern folk all sound exactly the same to me! Anyway, we stumbled across Northern media collective Give Over, on Wow247, who have translated hundreds of slang terms for an upcoming picture book.

Here’s a selection from letters A to M, along with some helpful illustration

‘Angin

angin

adjective \ˈaŋ-gin\

1. A sick feeling that comes after consuming too much alcohol or food at an earlier time.
2. Something so unpleasant to see, smell or taste that you feel slightly sick.

Origin: To experience something so awful it feels like being hanged by the neck until dead.

Synonyms: gross, minging, rough

Brassic

brassic

adjective \ˈbra-sik\

Definition: Having no money. Very poor.

Origin: Comes from the medical dressing boracic lint, which rhymes with skint. Boracic is pronounced ‘brassic’. Also used by Cockneys but not as well.

Synonyms: broke, skint

 

Cane

 

verb \ˈkān\

Definition: To vigorously consume an item, in reference to food, cigarettes or alcohol.

Origin: An item is eaten, drank or smoked at breakneck speed similar to the fast swipes of a cane.

Synonyms: hammer, hog, leather

Clocked

verb \ˈkläkt\

Definition: To see something of interest.

Origin: Relates to the face of a clock. To notice something means facing it, ergo clocking it.

Synonyms: seened, spied

Dibble

dibble

noun \ˈdi-bəl\

Definition: One or more members of the police force.

Origin: Refers to Officer Dibble from the popular Top Cat cartoon series.

Synonyms: coppers, rozzers

Eggbound

adjective \ˈāg-bau̇nd\

Definition: To be constipated, usually from eating too many eggs.

Origin: Eggs have binding properties, which when consumed in large amounts can ‘bind’ up the guts preventing them from working as normal.

Synonyms: bunged-up

 

Favver 

favvers

verb \ˈfa-vər\

Definition: To resemble someone or something to an eerie degree.

Synonyms: spits

Fod 

fod

noun \ˈfäd\

Definition: The part of the face above the eyes.

Origin: Shortening of the word forehead.

Synonyms: billy-big-bonce, slaphead

Gip 

gip

verb \ˈgip\

Definition: To be disgusted to the extent that results in a small unintentional vomit.

Origin: Onomatopoeic. The sound made as bile rises into the mouth.

Synonyms: vom

Innit 

innit

interjection \’ən-ət\

Definition: A meaningless noise used to add emphasis to the end of a statement or question.

Origin: Shortening of the term ‘isn’t it’.

Synonyms: eh eh, y’knar worra mean

 

Jammy 

jammy

adjective \ˈja-mē\

Definition: Having good luck, albeit undeserved.

Origin: From the popular biscuits Jammie Dodgers, which were named after the Beano character Roger The Dodger (a child famed for his ability to avoid chores and homework). Workers at the first Jammie Dodger factory in the mid 20th century were called ‘jammy’ due to their good fortune at working closely with delicious jam.

Synonyms: flukey

Kip 

kip

noun \ˈkip\

Definition: A deep state of rest during which your eyes are closed and you become unconscious.

Origin: Factory workers in the 19th and early 20th century would return home after a days shift to eat a large plate of kippers which would send them to sleep with a full belly. Also relates to the Danish word for a boarding house, ‘kippe’.

Synonyms: bobos, zone out

Lady Muck 

lady-muck

proper noun \ˈlā-dē mək\

Definition: A haughty person with ideas above their station.

Origin: The early 20th century socialite, Lady Norah Docker lived what was considered scandalous life for the era. ‘Lady Docker’ became a common term to describe someone who considered themselves high class despite evidence to the contrary. Over time the word ‘docker’ developed into the more derogatory word ‘muck’.

Synonyms: Mrs Fancypants, peas above sticks

Muggins 

muggins

noun \ˈməg-gənz\

Definition: Someone who is lumbered with thankless tasks, usually used about oneself and followed with the word ‘here’.

Origin: Adapting the term for street robbery, ‘mugging’, to refer to someone so malleable it is easy to take their time and possessions.

Synonyms: joey

*Yes, we know we’re missing a letter…but it wasn’t overly appropriate!

Love a bit of slang, don’t we?! But it’s not always appropriate. In fact, you should know exactly when it’s fine to use, and when to avoid at all costs! Take a look at our English Language courses here at The Sheffield College! We’ll help you out!

London, a change in photos!

Funny how things change. Funny how things change, with time. Funny old world, isn’t it? These photo’s have captured London’s vast, yet not entirely unrecognisable, change over the last 120 or so years. Funny old world.

Oxford Circus is just as busy today as it was in 1904, but the buildings and the vehicles on Oxford Street look vastly different.

Oxford Circus is just as busy today as it was in 1904, but the buildings and the vehicles  on Oxford Street look vastly different.

The area surrounding Harrods is now full of shops like Carphone Warehouse; back in 1904, there appears to have been a bakery shop in its place.

The area surrounding Harrods is now full of shops like Carphone Warehouse; back in 1904, there appears to have been a bakery shop in its place.

Hyde Park doesn’t look as elegant as it used to in the 1920s.

Hyde Park doesn't look as elegant as it used to in the 1920s.

Expedia UK

Even Covent Garden has changed. Here it is in 1905.

Even Covent Garden has changed. Here it is in 1905.

Fleet Street still has a gorgeous view of St. Paul’s Cathedral, but the bridge that was standing in the photo from 1890 is no longer there. One of the historical buildings is also now home to a mobile phone shop and artisanal cafe.

Fleet Street still has a gorgeous view of St. Paul's Cathedral, but the bridge that was standing in the photo from 1890 is no longer there. One of the historical buildings is also now home to a mobile phone shop and artisanal cafe.

Piccadilly Circus has become even more commercial, with retail giants like The Gap replacing the small off-license shops that were there in 1949.

Piccadilly Circus has become even more commercial, with retail giants like The Gap replacing the small off-license shops that were there in 1949.

From the road and buildings to the modes of transport used to travel across it, Cheapside has changed immensely. Here’s a photo of the famous road from 1909.

From the road and buildings to the modes of transport used to travel across it, Cheapside has changed immensely. Here's a photo of the famous road from 1909.

Impressive how a photo can capture the same thing. The same angles. The same shot, essentially. But yet reflect so much difference. Be it culture or architecture, a press of a button saves it all for life! To get involved with Photography at The Sheffield College, have a little click on this link!

14 difficult questions companies like Google and SpaceX have asked job candidates during an interview

Have you ever thought to yourself, mid-question, “why are you asking me this?” I’m sure you probably have. Often you’ll question this at home, maybe at work, and probably from one of your friends. Not in a Job Interview scenario though. Business Insider report that these are genuine questions asked by some of the biggest corporations around the world. And yes, they’re weird!

‘When a hot dog expands, in which direction does it split and why?’ —SpaceX Propulsion Structural Analyst job candidate

'When a hot dog expands, in which direction does it split and why?' —SpaceX Propulsion Structural Analyst job candidate

Flickr

‘Would you rather fight one horse-sized duck, or 100 duck-sized horses?’ —Whole Foods Market Meat Cutter job candidate

‘If you’re the CEO, what are the first three things you check about the business when you wake up?’ —Dropbox Rotation Program job candidate

‘What would the name of your debut album be?’ —Urban Outfitters Sales Associate job candidate

‘If you were a gerbil, which kind of gerbil would you be?’ —Airbnb Software Engineer job candidate

‘How would you sell hot cocoa in Florida?’ —J.W. Business Acquisitions Human Resources Recruiter job candidate

‘Google employment has doubled each year for the last x years. Given the current employment, how many years before Google employs the entire world population of y?’ —Google Software Engineer job candidate

'Google employment has doubled each year for the last x years. Given the current employment, how many years before Google employs the entire world population of y?' —Google Software Engineer job candidate

‘If I gave you $40,000 to start a business, what would you start?’ —Hubspot Account Manager job candidate

'If I gave you $40,000 to start a business, what would you start?' —Hubspot Account Manager job candidate

How many basketballs would fit in this room?’ —Delta Airlines Revenue Management Co-op job candidate

'How many basketballs would fit in this room?' —Delta Airlines Revenue Management Co-op job candidate

‘What would you do if you found a penguin in the freezer?’ —Trader Joe’s job candidate

'What would you do if you found a penguin in the freezer?' —Trader Joe's job candidate

‘If you were a brand, what would be your motto?’ —Boston Consulting Group Consultant job candidate

‘If you could go anywhere in the world, where would you go?’ —SkyWest Airlines Customer Service Agent job candidate

‘If you had $2,000, how would you double it in 24 hours?’ —Uniqlo Management Trainee job candidate

‘If you won the lottery and received $50 million, what would you do?’ —Deloitte Business Analyst job candidate

'If you won the lottery and received $50 million, what would you do?' —Deloitte Business Analyst job candidate

REUTERS/Lucy Nicholson

Fear not though, the majority of questions you’ll get asked in interviews will be fairly standard, work-related ones. Although, employers do love the “how would you describe yourself in 3 words…” monstrosity of a question. Hardworking, determined, err…anyway, check out the courses we have on offer here at The Sheffield College to get you that all important job interview!