Are you saying these everyday phrases wrong?

Having a grasp on the English language is so important. One comma in the wrong place or slip of the tongue can give something a new meaning. A meaning undesired which could land you in hot water!

But that’s not to say it’s an easy thing to get a grasp on.

The English language can be tricky.

Homophones — words that sound alike but are spelled differently — aren’t the only trap to avoid. People often use a word in place of one that sounds similar.

These malapropisms often have the unfortunate effect of making the speaker seem ignorant.

Read below to see 11 examples of words and phrases that often come out incorrectly.

1. For all ‘intents and purposes’  not for all ‘intensive purposes’

If you say “for all intensive purposes,” you mean “for all these very thorough purposes,” which doesn’t make any sense.

On the other hand, “for all intents and purposes” means “for all the reasons I did this and all the outcomes.” It’s a much stronger cliche.

2. Nip it in the ‘bud’  not nip it in the ‘butt’

This phrase should imply you cut a new bud (off a plant), not bit someone in the backside.

3. One ‘and’ the same — not one ‘in’ the same

“One in the same” refers to one thing in a group of other things that look the same — meaningless. “One and the same” means that two things are alike.

4. ‘Deep-seated’ — not ‘deep-seeded’

This phrase means something is firmly fixed in place, not that it is planted deeply, as the latter implies.

5. Case ‘in’ point — not case ‘and’ point

“Case in point” means, “Here’s an example of this point I’m trying to make.” The version with “and” makes them two different things, which isn’t helpful to your argument at all.

For the record, the plural is “cases in point.”

6. Should/could/would ‘have’ — not should/could/would ‘of’

Using “of” here is just wrong. You need to pair a verb with another verb. Otherwise, people will think “of” what?

7. You’ve got another ‘think’ coming — not you’ve got another ‘thing’ coming

The phrase was originally, “If that’s what you think, you’ve got another think coming.” We just dropped the first clause. Still, this may be a case where the misuse of the phrase now seems to be more popular that the original. Even former President Obama has used “thing” instead of “think.”

8. ‘Wreak’ havoc — not ‘wreck’ havoc

To “wreck” havoc means to destroy havoc, which is the exact opposite of this phrase’s meaning. When you “wreak havoc,” you’re spreading chaos, anarchy, and destruction everywhere, which is really fun.

9. I ‘couldn’t’ care less — not I ‘could’ care less

If you “could” care less, you’re admitting there are other, less important things in world, which takes away the sting of your comment. By saying you “couldn’t” care less, that means nothing else exists on the planet that matters less you. Major burn.

10. Please ‘proceed’ — not please ‘precede’

To proceed means to move forward, while to precede means to come before.

11. ‘Supposedly’ — not ‘supposably’

“Supposably” isn’t even a word. It’s a slight but important distinction.

If you would like to learn more about the English courses we have on offer here at The Sheffield College, please click here.

 

10 Brilliant Words That Describe The Indescribable

Finally!

You might not have heard of “grima”, but you have almost certainly felt it.

It’s a word to describe the feeling we get when we hear the sound of fingernails on a chalkboard, or a knife scratching a plate.

Now psychologists in Spain are suggesting it should be considered its own emotion.

Describing what “grima’ means to them, Spanish speakers said it was an “unpleasant sensation”, “shivering”, “sounds” and “repulsion”.

We’re not the only culture who doesn’t have this word

Some societies don’t even have a word for worry, whilst others have 15 words for fear.

Prof Vyvyan Evans, who specialises in language and communication, tells Newsbeat this phenomenon relates to something called “untranslatable words”.

Cosy books and blankets

Image captionHygge is the cosy feeling associated with sitting around a fire in the winter

“Emotions can be expressed in a range of ways, and emotions are universal,” he says.

Professor Evans says the reason English-speakers don’t have a word for “grima” is because “languages reflect their culture and words help to reinforce culture too”.

But this doesn’t mean that a particular culture is better or worse at expressing an idea.

It’s not all about the actual words we speak

“Language is very adaptive,” says Prof Evans.

“There is a range of ways in which we express emotion.

“In face-to-face spoken interaction, between 60% and 70% of our emotional expression actually comes, not from language, but from non-verbal communication.

Baby

Image captionGigil is urge to pinch or squeeze something that is irresistibly cute

He says the tone of your voice, or how high or low your pitch is, can also affect how you communicate and express your emotions.

“The face can produce over 10,000 expressions, many of which are associated with emotional experience,” he adds.

So, although we don’t have an English word for “grima”, we can all recognise the horrible faces you make when someone drags their nails down a blackboard.

Nine more words for emotions we could use in English

Hygge (Danish) – This is the pleasant, intimate feeling associated with sitting around a fire in the winter with close friends.

Tartle (Scots) – That panicky hesitation just before you have to introduce someone whose name you can’t quite remember.

Mamihlapinatapai (Yaghan language of Tierra del Fuego) – That special look shared between two people, when both are wishing that the other would do something that they both want, but neither want to do.

Iktsuarpok (Inuit) – That feeling of anticipation when you’re waiting for someone to show up at your house and you keep going outside to see if they’re there yet.

Greng-jai (Thai) – That feeling you get when you don’t want someone to do something for you because it would be a pain for them.

Gigil (Filipino) – The urge to pinch or squeeze something that is irresistibly cute.

Koi No Yokan (Japanese) – The sense upon first meeting a person that the two of you are going to fall in love.

Boketto (Japanese) – Gazing vacantly into the distance without thinking.

Schadenfreude (German) – Famous for its meaning, this refers to the feeling of pleasure gained by seeing another person’s misfortune.

If you have a love of words then why not check out our English Language A Level here at The Sheffield College? Click to find out how it could expand your vocabulary! 

The world’s coolest passport stamps

Some people collect stamps. In fact, there are probably quite a lot of people who collect stamps in the world. But how many people collect stamps of the world in their passport?

Here are some of the coolest stamps that you can collect in your passport from visiting another country:

Antarctica

antarctica passport stampFacebook

Though not technically a country, this continent is managed by more than 50 nations. There’s no official passport stamp, but visitors can get souvenir ones at the various scientific stations based there.

North Korea

north korean stampWikipedia

Given that fact that only about 1,500 tourists are allowed to visit the secret country each year, getting one of these on your passport is something pretty special. To get access, you must book a tour with approved companies—and you’ll receive your stamp upon entry.

Machu Picchu

machu picchu passport stampFacebook

Though this UNESCO World Heritage site is located in Peru, visitors can receive an additional special stamp in their passports at the entrance of the Incan ruins. What better way to mark the hiking feat?

Llanfairpwllgwyngyllgogerychwyrndrobwllllantysiliogogogoch

Llanfairpwllgwyngyllgogerychwyrndrobwllllantysiliogogogoch passport stampWikipedia

No, that’s not a typo. With 58 characters, this village in Wales has the longest place name in Europe, and second in the world. The novelty stamp is available in the James Pringle Weavers shop.

Tristan da Cunha

tristan da cunha passport stampFacebook

This island located in the South Atlantic Ocean is considered the most remote, inhabited isle in the world. There’s no airport, so visitors have to take a five-day boat ride from the nearest point in South Africa before getting the coveted stamp.

Akhzivland

Akhzivland passport stampWikipedia

Considered a micro-nation, this spot is located on the northern Mediterranean coast of Israel and is only 2.5 acres. There are only two residents, but they have the their own passport stamp.

Republic of San Marino

Republic of San Marino passport stampFacebook

It’s not the hardest stamp to get a hold of, but it’s certainly unique. This destination located in central Italy is the world’s oldest, smallest republic.

Guantanamo Bay, Cuba

guatanamo bay passport stampFacebook

Now that Cuba’s borders are a bit more relaxed for Americans, there will likely be a larger influx of visitors. But, getting into Guantanamo Bay still remains elusive. Only those with military business are allowed.

The South Pole

Amundsen Scott South Pole Station stampWikipedia

If you make it to the South Pole, you deserve a stamp. It’s obviously not a country, but ambitious trekkers can get a commemorative passport stam at Amundsen-Scott South Pole Station nonetheless.

Cayman Islands

cayman islands passport stampFacebook

Amazing images of the Eiffel Tower show its construction over two years

How many landmarks can you say you’ve actually seen the development of? Not very many, I would assume. Most of the world’s most important buildings have been here since, well, before us. Take the Eiffel Tower as it turns 128 years for instance…

The Eiffel Tower, which sits along Paris’ Champ de Mars, turns 128 years old this March.

From 1889 to 1930, it reigned as the tallest structure in the world.

Let’s take a look back at the Iron Lady’s construction, which spanned just two years.

The Eiffel Tower gets its name from its engineer, Gustave Eiffel, whose company designed and constructed the tower (Eiffel worked on the interior of the Statue of Liberty as well). Here’s an 1889 photo of him and another man standing near the top of the tower.

The Eiffel Tower gets its name from its engineer, Gustave Eiffel, whose company designed and constructed the tower (Eiffel worked on the interior of the Statue of Liberty as well). Here's an 1889 photo of him and another man standing near the top of the tower.

LIbrary of Congress

Source: Tour Eiffel

Construction began in January 1887. The design plans called for 18,038 pieces of wrought iron and 2.5 million rivets.

Construction began in January 1887. The design plans called for 18,038 pieces of wrought iron and 2.5 million rivets.

Wonderful Info

Source: Tour Eiffel

Approximately 300 workers were hired to work on the intricate structure.

Approximately 300 workers were hired to work on the intricate structure.

Public Domain

Source: Tour Eiffel

Thanks to safety precautions like guard-rails, only one worker died during its construction. In this 1888 photo, the tower’s first platform was completed.

Thanks to safety precautions like guard-rails, only one worker died during its construction. In this 1888 photo, the tower's first platform was completed.

Bettmann/Corbis

Source: ABC News

The plans also called for it to be built in just two years, in time for the 1889 Universal Exposition in Paris that celebrated the 100th anniversary of the French Revolution.

The plans also called for it to be built in just two years, in time for the 1889 Universal Exposition in Paris that celebrated the 100th anniversary of the French Revolution.

Roger Viollet/Getty

Source: Mental Floss

The Parisian government launched an open call for designs in 1886, and over 100 firms submitted. Eiffel’s idea was chosen unanimously, while rejected submissions including a lighthouse, a water tower, and a giant guillotine.

The Parisian government launched an open call for designs in 1886, and over 100 firms submitted. Eiffel's idea was chosen unanimously, while rejected submissions including a lighthouse, a water tower, and a giant guillotine.

Science & Society Picture Library/Getty Images

Source: Britannica

Locals called the metal tower’s design a “mast of iron gymnasium apparatus” and a “truly tragic street lamp.” The iron trusses allowed the structure to withstand winds, and the arches allowed for a height that reached 986 feet.

Locals called the metal tower's design a "mast of iron gymnasium apparatus" and a "truly tragic street lamp." The iron trusses allowed the structure to withstand winds, and the arches allowed for a height that reached 986 feet.

Public Domain

Source: Tour Eiffel

It was the world’s tallest structure until 1930, when the Chrysler Building in New York City surpassed it.

It was the world's tallest structure until 1930, when the Chrysler Building in New York City surpassed it.

Public Domain

Source: History.com

On time and under budget, the Eiffel Tower was completed on March 15, 1889, and the grand opening took place three months later.

On time and under budget, the Eiffel Tower was completed on March 15, 1889, and the grand opening took place three months later.

Library of Congress

Source: Tour Eiffel

Visitors came to marvel at its metalwork.

Visitors came to marvel at its metalwork.

Library of Congress

They could ride one of the tower’s five hydraulic elevators to the top. Each were divided into two compartments.

They could ride one of the tower's five hydraulic elevators to the top. Each were divided into two compartments.

Wikipedia Commons

Here’s a video from the Library Congress that shows a journey to the top of the Tower in 1990.

Source: Tour Eiffel

On a clear day, you can see 42 miles in each direction from the summit. Below is an 1889 photo of crowds standing along one of the tower’s balconies.

On a clear day, you can see 42 miles in each direction from the summit. Below is an 1889 photo of crowds standing along one of the tower's balconies.

Library of Congress

Source: “The Eiffel Tower

Shortly after its completion, electrical workers installed a few gaslights inside glass globes along the tower’s beams, as seen in the 1890 photo below. For the 1900 Universal Exhibition, 5,000 electric light bulbs were installed.

Shortly after its completion, electrical workers installed a few gaslights inside glass globes along the tower's beams, as seen in the 1890 photo below. For the 1900 Universal Exhibition, 5,000 electric light bulbs were installed.

Library of Congress

Source: Paris City Vision

Here’s a 1937 photo of a few workers replacing the lights.

Here's a 1937 photo of a few workers replacing the lights.

Electrical workers balance high up on the Eiffel tower in Paris to change the lights that illuminate the tower at night, Oct. 29, 1937.Horace Abrahams/Getty Images

In 1898, a radio antennae was added to the peak, which added 66 feet.

In 1898, a radio antennae was added to the peak, which added 66 feet.

Public Domain

Source: Tour Eiffel

Today, more than 7 million people visit this iconic tower every year.

Today, more than 7 million people visit this iconic tower every year.

Pexels

Source: Live Science

128 years later, it’s one of the most enduring symbols of Paris.

128 years later, it's one of the most enduring symbols of Paris.

Pixabay

 

Impressive, eh?! Every building has to start somewhere though and everyone who constructs the building has to start somewhere too. Like on one of our Civil Engineering courses here at The Sheffield College. Click the link for more information.

5 things you need to know before employing an Apprentice

As an employer, there has never been a better time to take on an Apprentice with over half a million new starts last year. More companies are doing it than ever before as they see the added value to their company in the short term, the long term and for the Apprentice themselves. With the Apprenticeship Levy coming into effect from 1st May there are likely to be more starts yet to come. Here’s what you need to know before recruiting an Apprentice.

What is the Apprenticeship Levy?

The Apprenticeship Levy is being introduced on 1st May to help increase Apprenticeship numbers and quality – delivering on the commitment that there will be 3 million additional Apprenticeship starts by 2020 – by putting you, the employer, at the heart of the system.

The Levy is set to be charged at a rate of 0.5% to all UK employers who have a total employee pay bill of over £3m with the purpose of increasing the quality and quantity of Apprenticeships in the UK.

The funds are saved to your Apprenticeship Service which you can access to fund an Apprentice through The Sheffield College.

What support do I need to give?

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As with any new employee your Apprentice will need time to settle in and get up to speed with things so it is important you support them in settling in and throughout their programme.

Take time to welcome your Apprentice and try and help them to feel part of the team. It’s always worth an early meeting to pass on some advice for the job and lay any expectations out before them. Also try to align any work that your Apprentice does with their Individual Learning Plan (ILP) as this will help their development.

From there, ensure that you have regular reviews with your Apprentice and Assessor who can answer any questions you may have.

What are the benefits to us as a company?

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No two businesses are the same. Industry is constantly changing and you have specific needs as an employer. As such, Apprenticeships are a great way of training employees to fit your company perfectly.

  • Apprentices are eager to learn. It’s an infectious exuberance which motivates the rest of your workforce and lowers staff turnover as 71% of employer retain their Apprentice
  • An Apprentice can be trained to meet the demands that you have thus closing or filling a skills gap within your business. 87% of all employer are satisfied with their Apprenticeship programme
  • Apprentices boost productivity in your business by an average of £214 per week
  • Apprentices can bring fresh ideas to your business. They are also a generation brought up in the digital age so you can tap into those skills as well
  • Our internal recruitment service, Job Connect, will handle the whole recruitment process for you

How many hours a week do we have an Apprentice for?

Apprentices usually work for at least 30 paid hours a week within your business. You can embed them within your team however you see fit but typically the Apprentice must attend The Sheffield College for their training one day a week. The day they will attend The Sheffield College is set by us.

They must work for a minimum of 16 hours and no more than 40 paid hours.

How much do I need to pay my Apprentice?

From April 2017, if your Apprentice is aged 16-18 or 19+ and in the first year of their Apprenticeship, you must pay them a minimum of £3.50 an hour.

You must also offer Apprentices the same conditions as other employees working at similar grades or in similar roles. Including:

  • Paid holidays
  • Sick pay
  • Any benefits you offer such as childcare voucher schemes
  • Any support you offer such as coaching or mentoring

If you are considering adding an Apprentice to your team we can help support you through the process, including the recruitment process. Please email employer@sheffcol.ac.uk or give us a call 0114 260 2600.

 

Why an Apprenticeship is right for your son or daughter: The Facts

Different methods of learning suit different people. That’s not to say one route is better than the other, they’re just different. Apprenticeships have previously suffered misconceptions that they are only in certain vocational and manual industries. That’s certainly not the case as the government has supported growth and an increase in quality of Apprenticeships to reach their aim of 3 million new Apprentices by 2020.

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This week is National Apprenticeship Week, a week celebrating all things Apprenticeships but also a week designed to raise awareness of the benefits doing an Apprenticeship can have on a person. Apprenticeships are at record participation levels right now with around 900,000 currently funded. With that in mind, here’s an idea of the benefits and impact an Apprenticeship could have on your son or daughter:

  • 92% of Apprentices in work felt that their Apprenticeship had had a positive impact of their career
  • Nearly all Apprentices feel that they acquire or improve their skills as a direct result of their Apprenticeship
  • 83% of Apprentices feel that their career prospects had improved, with 85% saying their ability to do the job they are doing had improved
  • After finishing, 90% of Apprentices stay in employment including 2% who go self-employed
  • 77% of Apprentices stay on with the same employer after finishing their Apprenticeship
  • On average, individuals who have completed an Advanced Apprenticeship earn between £77,000 and £117,000 more over their lifetime than similar individuals with Level 2 qualifications
  • And those who complete a Higher Apprenticeship could see an estimated increase of £150,000 in earnings over their lifetime
  • 46% of Apprentices have received a pay rise since completing their Apprenticeship
  • The Lifetime Earnings Premium for Apprentices in Arts, Media and Publishing is currently 270 per cent higher than for graduates
  • Agriculture, Horticulture and Animal Care were likely to outstrip their graduate counterparts in terms of wages by the highest amount – earning 211% more over the course of a working lifetime
  • A quarter of former Apprentices had been promoted with 12 months of finishing with 36% of Higher Apprentices being promoted after completing their Apprenticeship
  • More than 2,600 employers were involved in the design of the new Apprenticeship standards. This means that they are now more geared to equipping the Apprentice with the exact skills needed to make it in their chosen industry
  • The Sheffield College currently have over 100 live vacancies across more than 60 different frameworks

If you think that Apprenticeship might be a good option for your son or daughter and would like to view the Apprenticeships we have available, please visit www.sheffcol.ac.uk/apprenticeships, email jobconnect@sheffcol.ac.uk or give us a ring on 0114 260 2600.

 

5 things you need to know before applying for an Apprenticeship

There’s no better time to start an Apprenticeship than now. There are more Apprenticeships than ever before, more suited to employers and at higher levels. This week is National Apprenticeship Week, a celebration of all things Apprenticeships, so with that in mind here are 5 things that you need to know before applying…

The application process

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If you’ve decided that an Apprenticeship is for you, you’ll want to know how you go about applying for one. Don’t worry, the process is easy. With Apprenticeships in over 60 frameworks and over 100 current live vacancies, there’s plenty to choose from.

You can view all of our live vacancies here.

Once you’ve viewed the vacancies and found one you like the sound of, hit apply and follow the easy steps. We’ll pick it up and take it from there.

The recruitment process

Once you’ve applied, our Job Connect Team will pick up your application and let you know it’s been received. They’ll make sure you meet the requirements – if not check out our Apprentice Advantage course – before inviting you in for a chat about the vacancy you’ve applied for.

From there, your CV will be sent to the employer who will make a decision. If you’re successful you’ll be invited to an interview (or two) before hopefully getting a job offer and enrolling on your course with us.

When can I start?

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Before applying for an Apprenticeship always check the start date. Apprenticeships, unlike courses, don’t have to start in September meaning that you can start as soon as you finish school in July – just make sure you’re available.

Dates are rolling throughout the year so there will always be something starting soon.

How much will I get paid?

There’s not really a set amount for how much an Apprentice will get paid. It essentially depends on the employer and your age.

From April 2017, if you’re aged 16-18 or are aged 19+ and in the first year of your Apprenticeship, you will be paid a minimum of £3.50 an hour. Everyone else will be paid the national minimum wage as a minimum.

A lot of employers tend to pay more than this but always check the vacancy description. Oh, and, 46% of Apprentices have received a pay rise since completing their Apprenticeship.

Options after

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When you finish your Apprenticeship you’ve got a couple of options. They are:

If an Apprenticeship sounds like it might be for you and you would like to apply, or you would just like to find out some more information, please visit www.sheffcol.ac.uk/apprenticeships, email jobconnect@sheffcol.ac.uk or give us a ring on 0114 260 2600.

The Only Pancake Recipe You Need Today!

Happy Pancake Day!

By now we would anticipate that you’ve already had your pancake breakfast, pancake dinner and you’re well into the planning of your pancake tea (naturally followed by pancake pudding – naturally).

pcake

But hang fire just two secs, you’ve not tried our pancakes yet. The Sheffield College pancakes. Tried, tested and terrifically tasty pancakes.

The recipe is from our Head Chef and has been developed with the help of our Catering students. You won’t be disappointed…

For the pancakes you will need…

  • 2 eggs
  • Pinch of salt
  • 110g caster sugar
  • 575 ml whole milk
  • 225g strong flour
  • 10g melted butter

And you will need to make them like this…

  • Mix all the ingredients together to form a smooth pourable batter and leave to rest for 1 hour.
  • Heat a large frying pan with a little oil and pour in enough batter to thinly cover the base.
  • Cook over a medium heat until there is no liquid batter on the top of the pancake and then flip to cook the other side for another minute or so.
  • Remove and place on a warm plate. Repeat the cooking process and layer the pancakes with grease proof paper to stop them from sticking to each other.

Image result for pancakes with orange sauce

And then add some orange sauce by getting some of this…

  • 300ml orange juice
  • 75g sugar
  • 50g butter
  • zest 1 orange
  • 30ml Grand Marnier or Cointreau or brandy

Then putting them together like this…

  • Heat the sugar in a pan until it melts and turns straw coloured. Do not stir the sugar mix but swirl the pan occasionally.
  • When the sugar is golden, pour in the orange juice carefully, it will spit, then re boil the mix and add the butter and orange zest.
  • When the sauce is all combined, remove from the heat and stir in the alcohol.
  • Pour over the cooked pancakes with orange and lemon segments and serve immediately

That will, we promise, be the tastiest pancake you will find in Sheffield today.

If you love spending time in the kitchen and fancy gaining a Catering qualification – be it hobby, career or professional – check out our Catering courses at the College today! Click here for more…

Is this silver pen the future of electronics?

We’re living in a world of technological evolution and it’s showing no signs of letting up. Naturally not everything is up to standards but might this just been a game changer in electronics?

A start-up company in Japan, IgIC, has created a quite remarkable silver ink pen that allows you to draw electrical circuits. With silver having the highest conductivity among metal, the pen allows you to connect electrical circuits just by drawing on paper. Sounds bonkers, right? Let this video blow your mind!

 

Pretty unbelievable, that! The pen with its instantly conductive ink has been tipped to revolutionise the electronics industry and could lead to a cost reduction in circuit making.

Ok, so you need special paper that comes with batteries and lights as a starter point but the possibilities are pretty endless with something as intuitive as this.

If electronics turns your light on and you fancy gaining a qualification in the industry, check out our Electrical & Electronic Engineering course today!

Animator turns everyday objects into cartoons

We love getting creative here at The Sheffield College, that’s why we spent a load of money on making sure we have the best creative facilities in the region. It’s also why we love this fantastic video uploaded on to YouTube by Moochay Animation.

 

Everything from animals and plants, food and machinery, have been given a going-over by the brilliant cartoonists bringing just about everything to life by giving each an every object a distinctive personality. Genuis!

It’s ridiculously impressive how a clip of machinery at work can turn into something entirely different with a few animations. For any of you lot thinking that it looks like a cool career, because it just is, then check out our Graphic Design courses or take a look into our Creative and Digital Production Apprenticeship today!